• Bill Leinweber

  • About Bill Leinweber

    Bill Leinweber's mission is to help businesses and organizations grow by combining efficient processes with great customer and employee experience.

    Bill is the Chief Experience Officer & Owner of Landmark Experience LLC, a consultancy, where he loves to help business leaders walk in their customers' shoes and devise memorable and meaningful experiences for both customers, guests, visitors, employees and business partners. After all, have you ever heard of customer loyalty and business growth without GREAT customer experience?

    Bill's 30 year career spans retail and office products distribution operations in both small, family-owned and global mega-businesses. He has managed customer service operations, sales support, customer on-boarding and business intelligence teams while also serving as an internal consultant and subject matter expert. Bill has helped his past employers improve their customer engagement processes and achieve their goals of customer experience excellence and loyalty.

    Bill loves to talk and speak about customer experience as well, so don't be afraid to ask!

    Bill Leinweber
    Landmark Experience
    513-227-9037
    www.LandmarkExperience.com

Who’s Your Objective Outsider?

Photo by estimmel

I think every business needs an objective outsider. Or two, or three. What’s an objective outsider? I mean someone from outside the company, who doesn’t live the day-to-day of your business but who can give you, the business owner a fresh perspective from another vantage point. Many times, the people in the business are just too close to the business to notice, to see, or even to hear what’s wrong.

We’ve heard recently about all the changes going on at JCPenney. First, they’re doing away with coupons and confusing pricing. Now their makeover is getting a makeover. Everyone is ticked off at the CEO. Customers are confused. Then JCP announces that by 2014 they’ll do away with the checkout counters and cashiers and move to mobile check out options using Wi-Fi and radio-frequency technology. I applaud all the reinvention. However, I offer this – they’re forgetting to feel what it’s like to actually be inside the store.

I stopped by a JCPenney today to buy some socks. Mundane, yes but I needed socks and was driving by JCP so there you have it. About half way to the men’s department, a bellowing voice came over the loud-speaker system barking out a page of some kind. “MARIE, CALL EXTENSION 227. MARIE, 227 PLEASE.” I actually don’t recall what the announcement was but it was something along those lines. I can tell you this. The volume of that loud-speaker system was so loud, the sound was actually distorted. It was difficult to make out the actual words. Once the announcement stopped, the speakers went back to playing background music at a very low, barely audible level. Then another page, “BOB, PLEASE COME TO COSMETICS, BOB TO COSMETICS.” Again, I don’t recall exactly what was said. Nonetheless, I’m standing there thinking, could I really be the only person noticing that those speakers are turned up way too loud? Do any of the employees notice? Doesn’t the manager or assistant manager notice?  Do they usually have jack-hammers or buzz saws running in the store that these speakers have to be so loud?

Next, as I’m looking through the sock choices, a polite sales clerk approaches me asking if I needed assistance. Hanging from his belt loop is some sort of walkie-talkie phone communication device. As I’m chatting with this gentleman, his phone speaker is blurting out a conversation between other  employees, “TERRY, DO YOU HAVE THE TIMESHEETS?” “NO SUE, I’M IN WILL CALL.” “HAS ANGELA HAD HER BREAK YET?” And again, the volume on the phone was ALL THE WAY UP. When the sales clerk walked away to resume his conversation with two female employees in the aisle, I noticed that all three had these two-way radio devices hanging from their waists, each one barking out the conversations taking place between employees. I frankly got distracted wondering if Angela would ever get her break and where the heck were the timesheets? Now, I’m all in favor of giving employees technology to make their job and the customer’s experience better, easier, more efficient. But this is technology being mis-used and ill-executed.

I couldn’t wait to get out of JCPenney. I wondered if it would ever occur to a manager or employee that the high decibel announcements over the loud-speaker and the banal employee conversations blurting from radio speakers in the aisles just make for a downright unpleasant shopping experience? In a store like JCPenney, wouldn’t you want customers to be relaxed and take their time browsing? I would think so but no way. My nerves were shot from all the noise. The real question is, how does it go unnoticed?

So who do you use as your objective outsider? Someone who will tell you, “Hey bud, the volume is way to loud on that. You’re bothering your customers.” Or, “Just between you and me, your customers really don’t need or want to hear about timesheets or breaks. Just ask Disney, the nuts and bolts are underground and only the Magic is visible on Main Street, USA.” If the management and employees at JCPenney are deaf to all the unnecessary in store noise then what are you and your employees too close to? Are you too close to notice?

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